Kew sound mirrors

A pair of Richter Spielgeräte concrete sound mirrors in a small park on the banks of the River Thames at Kew in west London. Photographs taken on 11 March 2018.

Sunderland sound mirror goes viral

This tweet about the Sunderland sound mirror was a little bit popular!

Sound mirrors one of “12 intriguing places listed by Historic England in 2017”

Accoustic Mirrors, Fan Bay, St Margaret’s at Cliffe, Kent

The threat of aerial warfare in the 20th century provoked new systems of strategic air defence. Acoustic mirrors reflected the sound of distant aircraft onto a focal point where it was detected. The examples at Fan Bay are unusual as they are carved from the cliff face. The eastern mirror is one of the earliest, dating from about 1916. A second mirror dates from the early 1920s. The development of radar in the 1930s rendered sound mirrors obsolete. (Scheduled Monument. List Entry Number: 1442235)

Source: 12 intriguing places listed by Historic England in 2017

Abbot’s Cliff sound mirror art review

Abbot’s Cliff Sound Mirror – Strait of Dover is a picture of a “sound mirror” built during the World War II era for the purpose of amplifying the noise of approaching aircraft. […] Beam’s camera translates light and shadow into a negative, and then a print, the sound mirror takes what is unheard out of thin air and translates it to something we can hear. The old Zen question about the tree falling in the woods is meditative, but it is also scientific: If there is no one around to hear it, it definitively does not make a sound. Similarly, if there is no eye, there is no image.

The effectiveness of Beam’s pursuit is deepened by Section of Abbot’s Cliff Sound Mirror, prints made from charcoal rubbings of the stone mirror itself. […]
Source: “Robert Collier Beam: Scry” at Pump Project, The Austin Chronicle, 26 May 2017.